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University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology

Contact Information

Janice Barrabee
Program Coordinator
Louis J. Kolb Society of Fellows
University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaelology and Anthropology
3260 South Street
Philadelphia, PA 19104
(215) 898-4000
jbarrabee@kolbsociety.com

The Kolb Society junior fellows have yet to complete their dissertations and graduate from Penn. At this time there are twenty-three junior fellows, omitting the newly elected junior fellows for this academic year. Most of the junior fellows have been elected within recent years and are actively engaged in completing their dissertations.

Margaret Andrews
Art and Archaeology of the Mediterranean World Graduate Group
Elected: 2011

Meg received an A.B. in Classics from Princeton University in 2005. She is a doctoral candidate in the Art and Archaeology of the Mediterranean World graduate group. Her research focuses on both archaeological and theoretical aspects of urbanism and urban morphology in Roman cities, particularly Rome itself, during the first millennium A.D. Her dissertation, entitled "Down in the Valley: A Topographical Study of the Subura in Rome from Caesar through Charlemagne" is supervised by Prof. Lothar Haselberger. It addresses the physical and social evolution of the ancient Subura in Rome from the period of Caesar through that of Charlemagne and examines how the topographical development of the region both shaped and was shaped by the various social, political, and economic dynamics throughout the period.

Meg has been working on the Villa Magna Project since 2007, based near Anagni, Italy. Here, in addition to excavating, she studies the late antique and medieval occupation history of the site and the various building techniques of its structures. She received a Lemmermann Foundation fellowship for study in Rome in May-July of 2010. Meg also contributes to Penn's Mapping Augustan Alexandria project, and spent part of March 2010 on a research trip to that city. This spring she received the 2011-2012 Paul Mellon/Samuel H. Kress Foundation/Helen M. Woodruff Fellowship of the Archaeological Institute of America Pre-Doctoral Rome Prize. In 2012 she received the AIA Graduate Student Paper Award. She was awarded co-first prize for her paper "Monuments and Morality: The Forum Transitorium and Domitian’s Urban Program in the Subura."

Links
http://www.sas.upenn.edu/aamw/students
http://www.villa-magna.org/

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Rachel Aronin
Research Associate, Giza Project, Harvard University
Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations
Elected: 2000

Rachel graduated Harvard University in 1999 and received a B.A. with honors in Classical Studies with a minor in the Ancient Near East. She decided to pursue a Ph.D. in Egyptology in the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations at the University of Pennsylvania, where she has worked extensively with the Penn Museum's impressive Egyptian collections. Her research interests are varied and include Egyptian religion, funerary texts of the New Kingdom, Old Kingdom mortuary architecture and Ptolemaic history. She is currently working on her dissertation, entitled "The Use of Divine Determinatives as Classifiers in New Kingdom Books of the Dead."

Rachel has excavated and conducted research at a number of sites, such as Abydos in Egypt, Tel Harasim and Ashkelon in Israel and mainland Greece. Besides the Kolb Fellowship, she has also received the University Fellowship at Penn, the Harvard College Scholarship, the Elizabeth Cary Agassiz Certificate of Merit, the Dorot Travel Stipend to Israel and the Victor A. Lewinson Fellowship in Classics. Recent publications on her dissertation research include "'Sitting Among the Great Gods': Denoting Divinity in the Papyrus of Nu" in Millions of Jubilees: Studies in Honor of David P. Silverman, vol. 1, 2010, and "Divine Determinatives in the Papyrus of Ani" in Current Research in Egyptology VIII, 2008.

A frequent presenter at the annual meeting of the American Research Center in Egypt (ARCE), Rachel has also given lectures and led museum tours at Penn, the Franklin Institute, Swansea University in Wales and the Museum of Fine Arts (MFA) in Boston. For the last three years, she has worked as Research Associate for the Giza Archives Project (GAP) at the MFA, updating, correcting and digitizing excavation records and photographs from the 40-year Harvard University-Museum of Fine Arts Expedition to the Giza Plateau. These data have now been made available online at the GAP website. She has also collaborated on several research projects with international museums holding Giza collections (Cairo, Hildesheim, Turin).

Links:
http://www.gizapyramids.org
http://giza3d.3ds.com/#discover

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Darren Ashby
Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations
Elected 2013

Darren graduated magna cum laude from Boston University in 2008, where he received a B.A. in Archaeology and Anthropology. He is currently a doctoral candidate in the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations under the supervision of Senior Fellow Richard Zettler. Darren's primary research interest is Early Dynastic Southern Mesopotamia; increasingly, his secondary focus is the Early Iron Age in northeastern Iraq and northwestern Iran. In his dissertation, entitled "Late Early Dynastic Religious Architecture at Tell al-Hiba, ancient Lagash," Darren is reassessing the forms and functions of Late Early Dynastic religious architecture through the study of architecture uncovered in three different areas at Tell el-Hiba in southern Iraq. His committee consists of Senior Fellows, Richard Zettler, Holly Pittman, and Stephen Tinney.

Darren excavated for five summers (2005, 2007–2010) at the site of Tell es-Sweyhat in northern Syria. In 2006, he conducted CRM work in central and west Texas. Most recently, he served as the Field Director for the Rowanduz Archaeological Program (RAP), under the general direction of Michael Danti of Boston University, during its first season in northeastern Iraq in the summer of 2013. He returned to the site in summer 2014. Darren received an SASgov and Dean's New Media Award in May in order to document and disseminate his research in Iraq.

In 2011, Darren presented a paper at the ASOR Annual Meeting in San Francisco, and he presented another paper at the 2013 Annual Meeting in Baltimore in November. In October 2013, Darren discussed the preliminary results from RAP's fieldwork at the International Congress of Young Archaeologists, which was sponsored by and held at the University of Tehran. In summer 2013, Darren gave a talk on American contributions to the study of the Early Dynastic period in southern Iraq to a collection of students and professors from Mosul University at a workshop held by the Mosul Archaeology Program.

Darren was invited to become a member of Phi Beta Kappa in 2008. In 2013, he received a Harris Grant from ASOR in order to conduct excavations at the site of Qalaat Mudjesir in northeastern Iraq. Currently, he is a Graduate Teaching Fellow for the Critical Writing Program at the University of Pennsylvania.

Links:
http://www.sas.upenn.edu/nelc/
https://upenn.academia.edu/DarrenAshby

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Emerson Avery
Art and Archaeology of the Mediterranean World Graduate Group
Elected: 2008

Emerson Avery earned a B.A. in Ancient Greek from Haverford College and Classical and Near Eastern Archaeology from Bryn Mawr College in 2005. His senior thesis examined the expression of a nascent Greek ethnic identity at the colony of Empúries, Spain, during the Iron Age. He spent the 2005 academic year developing this research as a Fulbright Fellow at the German Archaeological Institute in Madrid. He joined AAMW in the fall of 2006.

Emerson has worked on projects in Spain, Italy, and France. His research interests lie with the construction of identity, especially in colonial and other situations characterized by an unequal power dynamic. His dissertation explores the development of settlement and communication dynamics in the hinterland of Marsala, Sicily during the period 300–900 C.E., from landscape archaeological and practice theoretical perspectives. This stems from his work with the Marsala Hinterland Survey (MHS), under the direction of Drs. Robert Schon of the University of Arizona and Emma Blake of Tufts University. In the summer of 2010 Emerson received departmental funding and a Salvatori Research Award from the Center for Italian Studies at Penn for his research in Sicily. In addition to his work at Marsala, He participated as a team member at Sofiana, an important Roman site in the province of Enna, Sicily, and one whose length of occupation parallels some of the villae documented in the area of Marsala. He recently gave a lecture on his research undertaken during the summer, in fulfillment of the terms of the Salvatori Research Award, entitled "Important Enough to Ignore: Sicily's Age of Imperial Inattention (1st–7th Cent. CE)."

Links:
http://www.sas.upenn.edu/aamw/

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Tiffany Cain
Department of Anthropology
Elected 2012

Tiffany graduated in June 2011 from Stanford University. She received her Master's degree in Anthropology and her Bachelor's degree in Archaeology, with Honors, minoring in International Relations. She joined the Department of Anthropology in the fall of 2012 as both a Kolb and a Fontaine Fellow, focusing on the archaeology of European colonial "contact" periods, especially in the Americas. Her other interests include landscape archaeology, heritage ethics and management, indigenous archaeology, community participatory research, and the sociopolitical issues surrounding the practice of archaeology and anthropology more broadly. While at Stanford, Tiffany was awarded the Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellowship and the Vice Provost for Graduate Education's Academic Achievement Award. She consistently earned the Dean's Award for Academic Excellence and was awarded both a University-wide Major Research Grant and Stanford Archaeology Center Research and Travel Grants. Additionally, she recently earned Honorable Mention for the Ford Foundation Pre-doctoral Fellowship and hopes to compete for this award again as a graduate student.

Tiffany's work with Martu in pursuit of both the Honors and Master's theses centered on Western Australia's Canning Stock Route and the complexities of reconciling conflicting notions of value, significance, and identity in the region. More specifically, she explored archaeology's role in the interplaying conversations about reconciliation, heritage and cultural landscapes. She is in the process of preparing this research for publication. She has presented her research at several research symposiums including the Native American Research Forum and, this May, she was invited to give a paper titled, "Becoming Black in Australia: Breaking Archaeology free of Acculturation Theory" at the Theoretical Archaeology Group Conference in Buffalo, New York. In addition to her research in Australia, Tiffany participated in two seasons of fieldwork at Çatalhöyük in Central Turkey and one season at Binchester Roman Fort in Northern England. She also served as editor-in-chief for the Department of Anthropology's Undergraduate Journal, Problematics. Following graduation from Stanford, Tiffany began work as a Research Associate for Archeo-Tec, Inc. Consulting Archaeologists in Oakland, California.

Links
http://upenn.academia.edu/TiffanyCain

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Mandy Chan
Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations
Elected: 2013

Mandy is a doctoral candidate in the East Asian Languages and Civilizations Department. She received her Master’s degree in Archaeological Conservation from the University of Bologna in 2007, and a B.A. in Anthropology from the University of Wisconsin. Her research focuses on the archaeology of early imperial China, cross-cultural exchanges along the "Silk Road," and Chinese imperial city planning and urbanism. Witnessing China's rapid economic growth in recent years, Mandy is also interested in examining how the country’s "soft power" and domestic policies have affected the management of archaeological sites, heritage tourism, and the illicit antiquities trade in mainland China and Hong Kong.

Mandy’s dissertation research involves a systematic analysis of waterworks of imperial Chinese cities in the Zhou, Qin and Han periods, and how hydraulic engineering impacted the imperial administration of the urban landscape. The research proposes an integrated use of traditional field survey methods and remote sensing techniques such as satellite imagery and near-surface geophysical prospecting methods for mapping and detecting buried hydraulic infrastructure. Field data will be supplemented with classical Chinese texts to provide a historical dimension. She hopes to advance the application of geophysical survey methods in traditional Chinese archaeological field practices through cooperation with Chinese colleagues.

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Peter Cobb
Art and Archaeology of the Mediterranean World Graduate Group
Elected: 2011

Peter has a B.A. from Dartmouth College in Engineering modified with Computer Science. In 2008, he earned a Master's degree in Information Science and a Post-Baccalaureate Certificate in Classics from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Peter is an A.B.D. doctoral candidate in the Art and Archaeology of the Mediterranean World graduate group. His primary advisor is Senior Fellow Brian Rose. Peter's research focus is the Late Bronze and Iron Ages in Anatolia and he has worked in Turkey for a number of years. Currently, his summer fieldwork includes a survey project north of Sardis in central Lydia, Boston University's Central Lydia Archaeological Survey, as well as Penn's Gordion Archaeological Project. He is also the database manager for the Upper Tigris Archaeological Research Project. Peter is particularly interested in Anatolia's interactions with the Greek world to the west and the Near Eastern polities to the southeast. He has been learning about different analytical methods for ancient ceramics, including petrography. He hopes to apply these skills to his dissertation research with a study of second millennium B.C.E. ceramics from across west-central Anatolia. Peter, along with Kyle Egerer, was a recipient of the ASOR Heritage Fellowship for the 2011 season of the Central Lydia Archaeological Survey (CLAS) in Western Anatolia.

Links
http://www.sas.upenn.edu/aamw/students/#Cobb
http://www.bu.edu/clas/
http://sites.museum.upenn.edu/gordion/
http://arcserver.usc.edu/

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Susannah Fishman
Department of Anthropology
Elected: 2013

Susannah is a fifth-year Ph.D. candidate in the Anthropology Department, with a concentration in Near East Archaeology. She attended McGill University in Montreal, Quebec, where she was on the Dean’s Honor List. She graduated with Great Distinction in 2009 with a B.A. in History, as well as a double minor in Anthropology and Jewish Studies. Susannah specializes in the archaeology of the Near East and Southern Caucasus from the Bronze Age through the Hellenistic periods. She is interested in ceramic technology and sourcing raw materials, ancient politics and empire building, as well as the political implications of modern archaeological practice. Since 2011, Susannah has been a teaching assistant in the Anthropology Department. She has been granted numerous awards at McGill and Penn, including the Kolb fellowship in 2013. Also in 2013 she received a Critical Language Scholarship for study in Baku, Azerbaijan. Susannah has recently been awarded an NSF Doctoral Dissertation Grant for her dissertation entitled "Ceramic Entanglements at the Urartian Periphery: Technological Analysis in Naxcivan, Azerbaijan." She was also awarded a graduate fellowship from the American Research Institute of the South Caucasus (ARISC), which help fund her dissertation fieldwork for the summer of 2014.

Susannah has excavated in the Near East with the Naxcivan Archaeological Project in Oglanqala, Azerbaijan, and with the Epipaleolithic Foragers in Azraq Project at Azraq, Jordan. In 2012 she was a supervisor at the Dhiban Excavation and Development Project in Dhiban, Jordan, under the direction of Fellow Benjamin Porter, where she also served as an instructor at the Dhiban Field School.

Susannah has given several conference presentations and invited lectures. In 2012 she presented "Making Memory in a Monumental Landscape: A Parthian Period Town" at the AIA Annual Meeting in Philadelphia, "Negotiating Empire: 2011 Excavations at Oglanqala, Azerbaijan" at Penn Museum (co-presented with Dr. Lauren Ristvet, and Junior Fellows Kathryn Morgan and Steve Renette.), "Domestic Implications of Imperial Entanglements: A Technological Approach" at Cornell University, and "Technological Change in Political Context: A Petrographic Analysis of Oglanqala Ceramics" at the ASOR Annual Meeting in Chicago. She has also served as a conference organizer for the 2012–2013 Anthropology Colloquium and the Center for Ancient Studies Conference "Strangers in a Strange Land" (2011) at Penn.

Link:
http://www.sas.upenn.edu/anthro/people/fishman

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Thomas Hardy
Department of Anthropology
Elected: 2013

Tom, currently a sixth-year Ph.D. Candidate in the Department of Anthropology, received a B.A. with Distinction in Archaeological Studies from Yale University in 2006. His Senior Honors Thesis involved a petrographic analysis of Formative Period ceramics from the Maya site of San Estevan, Belize, researching the standardization of ceramic styles as a way to investigate social and political complexity leading to the Classic Period.

After a brief hiatus, Tom entered the graduate program at the University of Pennsylvania in 2009. His current area of interest is in the south-central Andes, and he has been working in Cuzco, Peru over the last few years. Tom's specific interests have shifted from the Late Horizon (Inca Period, 1400–1532 A.D.) earlier to the Middle Horizon (600–1000 A.D.) in south-central Peru. His previous work in Cuzco has included excavations on Inca shrines in the ceque system, a set of more than 300 sacred shrines and landscape features organized into a set of forty-one conceptual lines, as well as a separate project attempting to understand and reconstruct the landscape modifications and urban development of the pre-Columbian city of Cuzco itself. Tom has also participated in the excavation of monumental architecture, on an Initial Period U-shaped temple in the Lurin Valley of Lima, Peru, under Dr. Richard Burger of Yale University in 2008, and atop the Akapana Pyramid platform at Tiwanaku, Bolivia, with Dr. Alexei Vranich of the Cotsen Institute, UCLA, in 2006.

Tom is currently conducting dissertation research at the site of Minaspata in the Lucre Basin, located at the eastern end of the Cuzco Valley near the large Wari site of Pikillacta. His specific interests are to better understand cultural and socio-political interactions between the Wari state and populations outside of its heartland—particularly, the ways in which Wari attempted to establish both political and ideological hegemony, if and how these attempts were resisted by different elements of local populations, and how the process of interaction was mediated through material objects, architecture and landscape. Though Minaspata is a large site with a local character and multi-component in nature, it presents an ideal opportunity to investigate these themes. With luck, his research at Minaspata (supported with grants from the National Science Foundation, the University of Pennsylvania School of Arts and Sciences Graduate Program, and the Selz Foundation) will serve as the basis for a larger, longer-term project in the region.

In addition, Tom has presented at the Society for American Archaeology Annual Meeting in 2011, in a symposium he chaired and helped organize, and has published a book review in Expedition Magazine in 2013. Tom has also served actively in the Department of Anthropology: on the Anthropology Colloquium Committee in 2011–2012, as a Graduate Student Representative, and helping to revive the Graduate Anthropology Forum, a weekly meeting of the graduate student community to provide feedback to each other regarding work and research interests.

Links:
http://www.sas.upenn.edu/anthro/people/hardy
http://upenn.academia.edu/ThomasHardy

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Leah Humphrey
Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations
Elected: 2012

Leah graduated summa cum laude from Bryn Mawr College in 2012, and received her B.A. honors for an independent major entitled Egyptian and Classical Languages and Literature. For the summer of 2011, Leah received the Hanna Holborn Gray Research Fellowship (funded by the Andrew J. Mellon Foundation) to pursue an independent research project focusing on the presence of similes and metaphors in Middle Egyptian tales. She expanded this topic for her senior thesis, which was entitled "An Analysis of Similes in Ancient Egyptian Literature," using examples from both Middle and New Kingdom literature. In May 2012, Leah was awarded the Gertrude Slaughter Fellowship, which is given to a member of the graduating class for excellence in scholarship and carries funding for further study in the United States or abroad.

Leah served as a teaching assistant at Haverford College in Professor Brett Mulligan's Greek course, and then conducted research for Professor Mulligan on Egyptian medical papyri. From September 2010 until December 2011, she worked on the excavated material from Beth Shean for Katy Blanchard in the Near Eastern section of the Penn museum. In December 2011 and January 2012, she participated in the Abydos excavation directed by Professor Josef Wegner, where she contributed to the epigraphic analysis. Currently, she is working in the Egyptian section of the museum under Professor and Senior Fellow David Silverman and Professor Jennifer Wegner. Leah is helping to identify and catalogue personal names on objects found in storage. Her own research thus far has primarily taken a philological approach.

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Patricia Kim
Department of the History of Art
Elected: 2012

Patricia graduated in 2012 with her B.A. in both Art History and Near Eastern studies with highest distinction from UC Berkeley. She entered Penn in the fall of 2012 as a graduate student in Art History with interests in the Hellenistic Near East and Egypt. At Penn, she hopes to explore the issues concerning the Hellenistic "peripheries" and how identities are negotiated through the visual. During the past three seasons, she excavated and served as a staff member at Tel Ashkelon, a site located on the coast of modern-day Israel and a member of the Philistine pentapolis during the Bronze and Iron Ages. In 2010, she helped create SHARE (the Society for Humanitarian Archaeological Research and Exploration), a not-for-profit organization focused on the idea of archaeological research as an opportunity for dialogue and a potential transformative power in ethnic and territorial conflicts.

Patricia has two papers, both of which she presented in the spring of 2012, that are in the process of publication. The first, entitled "The Materiality and 'Enchantment' of the Gebel el-Arak Knife and the Gerzean Flint Blade Production," was awarded the Library Prize for Undergraduate Research and received highest honors as a senior thesis. The second paper is entitled "It's a Woman's World! The Case of the South-Italian Squat Lekythos at the Hearst Museum," and explores issues of object agency and female experience. Additionally, Patricia was the recipient of a Beinecke Fellowship and was inducted into Phi Beta Kappa in 2011. During her time at Berkeley, she was also awarded the Leadership Award for her work with SHARE and excavation experience as well as the Sultan Grant, which funded research for her senior honors thesis.

Links:
http://archshare.org/SHARE_Website/Home.html\
http://www.sas.upenn.edu/arthistory/
http://upenn.academia.edu/PatriciaEKim

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Sam Lin
Department of Anthropology
Elected: 2012

Sam received a B.A. in Anthropology and Geography in 2007 and a B.A. (Honours) in Anthropology in 2008 at the University of Auckland. As an undergraduate, he worked on projects in New Zealand, Australia, Far East Russia, Egypt, and China, with time periods ranging from the Upper Paleolithic to the historic period. He is interested in the role of stone tool technology in human-environment interaction within the context of human evolution. In his dissertation research, Sam examines the behavioral process that underlies stone tool variability between different Mousterian industries from the sites of Roc de Marsal, Pech de l'Aze IV, and Combe Capelle. Aiming to move beyond traditional frameworks based largely on typology, he employs newly developed methods of cortex quantification, simulation, and models derived from controlled experiment on flake formation to examine Mousterian assemblages from an economic, behavioral, and formational perspective. Aside from his dissertational research, Sam is involved in the experiment project investigating the process of flake formation directed by Senior Fellow, Professor Harold Dibble. He is also currently involved in the excavation of the Middle Paleolithic sites of La Ferrassie and La Gane in southwestern France (both directed by Harold Dibble). While Sam's research focus is mainly on the general relationship between technological behavior and the environment, his has particular interest in the stone tool record of Eurasia, Africa, East Asia, and Oceania. In 2013 Sam was named an SAS Dean's Scholar.

Sam has published several papers in the Journal of Archaeological Science on topics including the use of 3D scanning on stone tool analysis and geochemical sourcing of obsidian artifacts using portable XRF. He co-authored "The Relative Effects of Core Surface Morphology on Flake Shape and Other Attributes" published in Journal of Archaeological Science with Junior Fellow Zeljko Rezek, Fellow Radu Iovita, and Senior Fellow Harold Dibble. Sam also co-authored "On the Industrial Attributions of the Aterian and Mousterian of the Maghreb" (submitted to Journal of Human Evolution) and "New Excavations at the Site of Contrebandiers Cave, Morocco" (submitted to PaleoAnthropology) with Harold Dibble, Zeljko Rezek, and others. Currently, Sam is preparing manuscripts titled "Testing the Effects of Neutral Artifact Removal on Lithic Assemblage Formation and Cortex Composition" with Matt Douglass (University of Nebraska, Lincoln), Daniel Parker (University of Auckland), and Simon Holdaway (University of Auckland), and "How Hominins Economized Stone Resources over the Past 2.0myr" with Harold Dibble, Zeljko Rezek, David Braun (University of Cape Town), and Shannon McPherron (Max Planck Institute of Evolutionary Anthropology). He has made multiple presentations at international conferences on the use of 3D laser scanning, cortex quantification, computer simulation, and controlled experiment on the study of stone tool artifacts.

Links:
http://upenn.academia.edu/SamLin

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Jose Maria Lopez Bejarano
Department of Anthropology
Elected: 2005

Jose is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Anthropology at Penn. In 2001 he graduated with a degree in archaeology from the Universidad Mayor de San Andres in La Paz, Bolivia.

Jose's concentration is on Andean Archaeology. He has participated in excavations of the Inca settlement at Pumapunku temple in Tiwanaku, Bolivia; and survey of Inca sites in the Titicaca Basin, as well as survey of high altitude sanctuaries in Bolivia. His research interests include Andean complex societies, Tiwanaku urbanism, Inca ideology, sacred landscapes, and memory and materiality.

In 2008 Jose started a program of archaeological surveys in the Copacabana Peninsula, located in the Titicaca Basin. The aim of this study is to determine the spatial characteristics and extension of the Inca settlements in the region. Currently Jose is writing his doctoral thesis under the supervision of Dr. Clark Erickson.

Links:
http://www.sas.upenn.edu/anthro/

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Kathryn Morgan
Art and Archaeology of the Mediterranean World Graduate Group
Elected: 2013

Kate received her B.A. in 2007 from Wellesley College in Massachusetts, with a double major in History of Art and Classical Civilizations. She continued her study of Classics at Balliol College, Oxford, earning an M.St. in Greek and Latin Languages and Literature in 2008. She is currently a doctoral candidate in Penn’s Art and Archaeology of the Mediterranean World program, where she focuses on broad questions of identity and social change in the first millennium B.C.E. in Anatolia and the ancient Near East.

Kate conducts research on textile production as part of the University of Pennsylvania’s Gordion Project in central Turkey. She hopes to supervise further, focused excavation on Gordion’s citadel mound as part of her dissertation research in summer 2014. Her dissertation, tentatively titled "Tangled Webs," will draw on ethnographic and experimental archaeology to explore the role that textiles and their producers played in forging communal identities, and on the evolution of those communities over the course of the Iron Age—a period of social and political upheaval in the ancient Near East.

Kate has conducted fieldwork in Italy, Greece, Turkey and Azerbaijan. She has been a member of the Oriental Institute’s Neubauer Expedition to Zincirli since 2008, where she supervises the excavation of domestic contexts in the Lower Town. Her scholarship on textile tools and site stratigraphy will appear in the forthcoming expedition monographs, Sam’al 1 and 2. Since her arrival at Penn, she has participated in the Naxçivan Archaeological Project, directed by Penn professor Dr. Lauren Ristvet, and will travel to Oman this winter to take part in the Penn-sponsored Bat Archaeological Project with project co-director and Kolb Fellow, Christopher Thornton.

In 2012, Kate presented papers at the Annual Meeting of the American Schools of Oriental Research in Chicago, Illinois, and at the "Rags to Riches" textiles symposium at the University of Reading, England. She presented her paper "The Assyrians Abroad: Space Syntax Analysis and Administrative Architecture at Zincirli, Turkey," with co-author and Junior Fellow Lara Fabian, at the 9th International Congress on the Archaeology of the Ancient Near East (ICAANE 9) in Basel, Switzerland in June 2014.

Links:
http://www.sas.upenn.edu/aamw/students/#Morgan
http://upenn.academia.edu/KateMorgan


Theresa (Tracy) Musacchio
Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations
Elected: 2000


Tracy is enrolled in the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations, and her advisor is Senior Fellow David Silverman.

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Daira Nocera
Art and Archaeology of the Mediterranean World Graduate Group
Elected: 2012

Daira Nocera earned her B.A. in Classics, with a focus on archaeology, at the University of Pisa, Italy, in 1999, where she completed a thesis on the Roman military installations along the eastern limes. During her undergraduate years she participated in archaeological excavations in various sites across Italy. She then completed a graduate program in the School of Specialization in Classical Archaeology at the University of Genova, Italy, in 2007, where she wrote her thesis on an amphorae context from the Forum of Nerva. An article from her thesis is part of a forthcoming publication for the B.A.R. Daira joined the AAMW program at the University of Pennsylvania in the Fall of 2010 with the aim of furthering her interests in Roman imperial architecture, topography, limes issues, techniques and methodologies of excavation, computer applications, and material culture with a special focus on amphorae, trade, and economy. Her dissertation will focus on Domitian's building projects in the city of Rome and their impact on the topography of the city.

Before joining AAMW, Daira lived and worked in Rome for seven years, where she participated in the excavations in the Forum of Augustus, the Forum of Caesar, and the Palatine. She is currently involved in the excavation project at the Villa of Maxentius, Rome, with the University of Boulder, Colorado. Daira also worked as an instructor of Roman History and Latin Epigraphy for IES (Chicago), a study abroad program for American undergraduates. Her work earned her an  "Excellence in Teaching" award for the academic year 2009–10. Daira has recently developed an interest in Byzantine architecture. She presented a paper on the 5th century church at Beth Shean at the AIA 2012 conference in Philadelphia and will soon publish this work as part of a series of papers on the site.

Links:
http://www.sas.upenn.edu/aamw/students/#Nocera

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Nicholas S. Picardo
Research Associate, Harvard University, The Giza Project
Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations
Elected: 1997

Nicholas graduated from Penn in 1997 summa cum laude with a B.A. in Anthropology. He was Phi Beta Kappa (1997), Dean's Scholar, Benjamin Franklin Scholar, and received the Department of Anthropology Undergraduate Thesis Prize. During his graduate career, in addition to the Kolb fellowship, he has received the William Penn Fellowship (1997–2001) and the U.S. Department of State, Bureau of Educational & Cultural Affairs Fellowship (2003–2004). His dissertation, supervised by Prof. Josef W. Wegner is entitled "The Hybrid Household:  A Diachronic Study of Household Activity and Administration Through an Analysis of a Single Elite Domestic Unit in the Town of Wah-sut at South Abydos." Senior Fellows David Silverman and Robert Preucel are also advisors.

Nicholas is now a Research Associate at Harvard University, continuing his work on the Giza Project. He was employed as a Research Associate at the Giza Archives Project of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (2010–2011). He has taught household archaeology to undergraduate and graduate students as a Visiting Instructor of Egyptology in the Department of Egyptology and Ancient Western Asian Studies at Brown University (2010). He worked periodically as Research Associate in the Art of the Ancient World Department of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston since 2005. As Curatorial Research Associate (2008–2010) he co-curated the archaeologically oriented exhibition The Secrets of Tomb 10A: Egypt 2000 BC, for which he also co-authored the exhibit's companion volume of the same name (MFA Publications, 2009). He has recently given papers or invited lectures at the 61st Annual Meeting of the American Research Center in Egypt, Brown University, and the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

Nicholas' research interests include domestic/household archaeology, settlement archaeology, Old and Middle Kingdom Egypt, ancient Egyptian society, magic and religious/ritual practices, performance studies, and material culture studies. Though his earliest excavation experience was in northwestern Pennsylvania, he has worked mainly in Egypt at the sites of Abydos, Giza, and Saqqara. His own archaeological fieldwork operates under the auspices of the Pennsylvania-Yale-Institute of Fine Arts, New York University Expedition to Abydos.  Nicholas is Director of the South Abydos Settlement Excavation E (SASEE) Project, from which his dissertation research is drawn. He recently contributed an article, "(Ad)dressing Washptah: Illness or Injury in the Vizier's Death, as Related in His Tomb Biography," to the Jubilee volume in honor of Senior Fellow David Silverman. He explored one interest in the archaeology of ancient Egyptian funerary religion with the article "'Semantic Homicide' and the So-called Reserve Heads: The Theme of Decapitation in Egyptian Funerary Religion and Some Implications for the Old Kingdom," Journal of the American Research Center in Egypt, 43 (2007): 221–252. He has twice (2006, 2007) written on aspects of work at Abydos, Egypt for the Penn Museum Journal, Expedition, and has contributed several entries/articles to a recent World History Encyclopedia, ABC-Clio, 2011.

Links:
http://www.mfa.org/giza
http://independent.academia.edu/NicholasPicardo/Papers
http://www.nyu.edu/gsas/dept/fineart/academics/abydos/abydos-current.htm
http://giza3d.3ds.com/#discover

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Jordan Pickett
Art and Archaeology of the Mediterranean World Graduate Group
Elected: 2011

Jordan graduated in 2006 from Indiana University with a B.A. in the History of Art, Religious Studies, and Medieval Studies. He is a doctoral student in the Art and Archaeology of the Mediterranean World graduate group, and his dissertation advisers are Profs. Robert Ousterhout, John Haldon, Ann Kuttner, and Renata Holod, who is a Kolb senior fellow. With interests situated at the intersections of visual culture with economic and social history, Jordan's first articles are in press 2011–2012. These initial publications are concerned with the comparative energetics of medieval architecture, landscape archaeology, the art of Byzantine iconoclasm, and the reception of late antique architecture from Palestine in the early modern period. Jordan's dissertation, "Water After Antiquity: the Afterlives of Roman Hydraulic Infrastructure in the Eastern Mediterranean (c. 300–900 A.D.)" is a comparative study exploring the diverse afterlives of Roman baths and hydraulic architecture across the Mediterranean in the early Middle Ages, from the perspectives of Byzantium and the Caliphate. After past fieldwork in Italy and Turkey, Jordan very much looks forward to joining the Danish team at Jarash in the summer of 2012 for work related to his dissertation.

Links
http://www.sas.upenn.edu/aamw/students
http://www.princeton.edu/avkat/index.xml
http://upenn.academia.edu/jordanpickett

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Amanda Reiterman
Art and Archaeology of the Mediterranean World Graduate Group
Elected: 2010

Amanda earned a B.A. in Archaeological Studies from Yale University in 2002, with her senior thesis examining the role of the crocus in the Bronze Age Aegean economy and rites-of-passage. The following year she earned her M.St. in European Archaeology at Oxford University with concentrations in Greek Vase-painting and the Archaeology of Bronze Age Greece. In 2006, she completed the Post-baccalaureate Program in Classics at the University of Pennsylvania. The same year, she entered the Ph.D. program in the Art and Archaeology of the Mediterranean World at Penn. During the 2010–2011 academic year, she studied in Athens as a Regular Member at the American School of Classical Studies with the support of the Anna C. and Oliver C. Colburn Fellowship from the Penn museum.

Amanda's dissertation, entitled "Κειμήλια: Objects with Histories in Greek Mainland and Colonial Contexts during the 6th and 5th Centuries B.C." and advised by Prof. Ann Brownlee, explores the archaeological and historical contexts of objects that were curated by their ancient owners. Her other current research interests include ceramic production technology at the Potters' Quarter of Corinth, Greek vases and iconography, the small poros pediments of the Archaic Athenian Acropolis, the Homeric epics, and, in general, how ancient societies approached the past.

Her fieldwork experience includes excavations in Connecticut, Copacabana Bolivia, Akrotiri, Pompeii, the Agora Excavations in Athens, S.H.A.R.P. (the Saronic Harbors Archaeological Research Project), and Dickinson College's Excavation of the Lower Town at Mycenae. Her first publication, "Clamp-holes and Marble Veneers: the Pantheon's Lost Original Facing," the result of a research project supervised by Prof. Lothar Haselberger, appeared as an Archaeological Note in the 2010 issue of the Journal of Roman Archaeology. She presented this research as a poster at the 2009 Annual Meeting of the Archaeological Institute of America, which won the prize of Runner-up for Best Poster. At the 2010 AIA meeting, she delivered a paper on Early Bronze Age trade networks in the Northeastern Peloponnese, which was informed by her work at S.H.A.R.P with Prof. Thomas Tartaron. She continues to assist Prof. Ann Brownlee with the publication of Penn museum's red-figure cups for the Corpus Vasorum Antiquorum (CVA). She was named a Dean's Scholar in 2010, and received the School of Arts and Sciences Dean's Award for Distinguished Teaching by Graduate Students in the same year. During 2009–2010, Amanda served as a Graduate Teaching Fellow for the Center for Teaching and Learning.

Links:
http://www.sas.upenn.edu/aamw

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Steve Renette
Art and Archaeology of the Mediterranean World Graduate Group
Elected: 2012

Steve Renette graduated with an M.A. in Archaeology from Ghent University in Belgium in 2007. For his master's thesis he reanalyzed the early third millennium B.C.E. monumental circular constructions from the Hamrin Valley in Central Iraq, resulting in an article in the journal Paléorient in 2009 and a contribution to the Susa and Elamconference volume in 2012. He went on to Leiden University in the Netherlands for a two-year research master program from which he graduated in 2010 with a thesis on mobility and social complexity in the ancient Near East. During this time he built up fieldwork experience at various sites in Belgium, Tunisia, and Corsica. Over the past few years his fieldwork has focused on the Middle East, in Syria, Azerbaijan, the United Arab Emirates, and most recently in Iraqi Kurdistan.

In 2010 Steve entered the Ph.D. program Art and Archaeology of the Mediterranean World at the University of Pennsylvania. In order to continue exploring the interaction sphere encompassing Mesopotamia and the Iranian highlands in the Bronze Age, his dissertation will focus on the developments in the so-called Trans-Tigridian Corridor under the guidance of Professors Holly Pittman (a Kolb senior fellow), Richard Zettler (a Kolb senior fellow), and Lauren Ristvet. By bringing together the limited archaeological and textual information from this understudied region between the Tigris River and the Zagros Mountains, the supposedly peripheral Trans-Tigridian Corridor can be given its own place in our understanding of the ancient Near Eastern world. Data from the Mahidasht Survey Project, led by Dr. Louis Levine, and kept at the Royal Ontario Museum in Toronto, forms the core of his dissertation project. This unpublished dataset will be supplemented by new evidence from the Bazyan Valley in Iraqi Kurdistan where Steve is co-directing fieldwork focused on the Late Chalcolithic and Early Bronze Age site of Kani Shaie together with colleagues from the University of Coimbra (Portugal).

In addition, Steve is one of the researchers in the al-Hiba Publication Project led by Professor Holly Pittman for which he is analyzing and organizing the ceramic material. He also continues to explore a variety of research interests pertaining to early Mesopotamia and Iran, such as the role of ancient feasting practices.

Links
http://www.sas.upenn.edu/aamw/students/#Renette
http://upenn.academia.edu/SteveRenette

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Zeljko Rezek
Department of Anthropology
Visiting Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey
Elected: 2011

Zeljko received his B.A. in Archaeology, from the University of Zagreb, Croatia. He is a doctoral student in the Anthropology department, specializing in the Middle Paleolithic of the Near East and North Africa, and his advisor is Senior Fellow Harold Dibble. In his dissertation, he looks at the vertical distribution of the archaeological material within layers of the same Mousterian industries or types in the Middle Paleolithic sites of Pech de l'Aze IV and Roc de Marsal in SW France, in order to assess the degree of variability in the accumulation of the material culture that characterizes particular types of Mousterian. This will enable him to test definitions and reality of Mousterian types, as well as to explore means of defining an archaeological assemblage as a unit of analysis in Paleolithic archaeology in a way that differs from the traditional approach based solely on a contextual scale of a geological layer. Zeljko has participated in excavation and survey projects in Europe, North Africa, and the Near East. He has also been involved in Harold Dibble's glass experiment project, which examines the physical variables that are present at flaking and the effects that those variables have on flake attributes. In June 2011 he conducted preliminary fieldwork at the Middle Paleolithic site of Ain Difla in Jordan, which he sees as his future (post graduation) research project. In 2012 Zeljko was named a Dean's Scholar, one of twenty students selected from the College of Arts & Sciences, the College of Liberal and Professional Studies, and the Graduate Division at Penn.

Zeljko has published with Senior Fellow Harold Dibble, "Introducing a New Experimental Design for Controlled Studies of Flake Formation: Results for Exterior Platform Angle, Platform Depth, Angle of Blow, Velocity, and Force," Journal of Archaeological Science 36 (2009): 1945–54; "The Relative Effects of Core Surface Morphology on Flake Shape and Other Attributes," Journal of Archaeological Science 38 (2011): 1346-59, with Harold Dibble, Fellow Radu Iovita, and Sam Lin; and in preparation "The Moroccan Aterian and Mousterian: A Problem in Archaeological Systematics," with Harold Dibble, Vera Aldeias, Ekaterina Doroncheva, Esteban Alvarez-Fernandez, Emily Hallett-Desguez, Sam Lin, Zenobia Jacobs, Deborah Olszewski, Kaye Reed, Daniel Richter, Carolyn Barshay-Szmidt, and Mohamed El-Hajraoui.

Links
http://www.sas.upenn.edu/anthro/
http://pech.museum.upenn.edu/
http://www.oldstoneage.com/rdm/index.shtml
www.oldstoneage.com
http://anthro.rutgers.edu/visiting-assistant-professor-directory/42-zeljko-rezek

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Jamie Sanecki
Department of the History of Art
Elected: 2012

Jamie graduated from Rutgers University in 2006 with a B.A. in Art History and English and earned an M.A. in Art History from Williams College in 2009. Her master's thesis focused on the twelfth-century facade sculptures of Modena Cathedral and explored the relationship between art and liturgy. Jamie is currently a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of the History of Art, where her main research interests are Romanesque sculpture and the arts of the medieval Mediterranean region. Her dissertation on the sculpture and architecture of Romanesque Lucca considers how the social and political developments of its communal period shaped the city's visual culture.

Jamie has received grants from the Associate Alumnae of Douglass College, the DAAD, and the Center for Italian Studies at Penn, and she has recently presented her research at the Center for Italian Studies and the Philadelphia Museum of Art. She has also participated in curatorial projects at the Jersey City Museum, the Williams College Museum of Art, and the Penn Museum, where she helped organize the exhibition, “Archaeologists and Travelers in Ottoman Lands.” Her essay on a nineteenth-century painting by Ottoman artist Osman Hamdi Bey appears in the exhibition catalog for this show, Osman Hamdi Bey and the Americans: Archaeology, Diplomacy, Art (Istanbul: Pera Museum, 2011).

Links
http://www.sas.upenn.edu/arthistory/people/graduate-students

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Monique J. Timberlake
Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations
Elected: 2000

Monique is employed as a coordinator for the Center for Technology Transfer at Penn.

She supports invention disclosure review, patent filing, prosecution and maintenance, and negotiates inter-institutional agreements.

Links:
http://www.ctt.upenn.edu/index.html

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