University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology

Kolb Past Events

Archive of Events Involving Kolb Society Fellows

December 2012


December 3: Lecture at the Department of Anthropology, University of Minnesota

Dr. Rachel Scott, Fellow, Assistant Professor with the School of Human Evolution and Social Change at Arizona State University at Tempe

Masculinity and Warfare in Early Irish Society

Abstract
While the archaeology of gender has become established as a viable area of inquiry, research has focused almost entirely on women. Yet understanding human social life in past societies necessitates the equal consideration of male gender ideologies and roles. This paper contributes to the development of archaeological research on masculinity by exploring the relationship between warfare and masculine identity in early medieval Ireland (c. AD 400-1200). Current knowledge of gender in early Irish society derives primarily from the contemporary texts. Written by an elite group of educated males, these documents depict an idealized world in which women and men fulfill the roles considered appropriate for their gender. Analysis of the archaeological and human skeletal data, however, reveals that this perception did not always translate into the actual performance of gender identities. In the case of men, the sagas glorify the male warrior, and the annals record numerous incidents of small-scale warfare. In contrast, excavations have recovered only occasional weapons and possible settlement defenses. The human skeletal remains similarly show little trauma caused by interpersonal violence. Rather than prioritizing any line of evidence, I integrate them to produce a more nuanced interpretation of masculinity—as both perceived and performed—in early Irish society.

November 2012


November 10: Waters for a Capital Conference at the Koç University Research Center for Anatolian Civilization (sponsored by Koç University Research Center for Anatolian Civilization, Istanbul Technical University, and the University of Edinburgh)

Jordan Pickett, Junior Fellow

Temples, Churches, and Cisterns: Water Management in Post-Classical Jarash

November 2–4:Working Group in Medieval Sculpture, 1100–1550 - A Transatlantic Dialogue: Sculptural Reception, November 2–4, 2012, University of Pennsylvania & Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia

Julia Perratore, Junior Fellow

Reaching out to a Lay Viewership in Twelfth-Century Aragon: The Reception of Santa María de Uncastillo

November 1-4: Thirty-Eighth Annual Byzantine Studies Conference, Hellenic College Holy Cross, Brookline, Massachussettes (Conference sponsored by Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture, the Cantonis Chair of Byzantine Studies, the Tousimis Fund, and Hellenic College Holy Cross Greek Orthodox School of Theology)

Jordan Pickett, Junior Fellow

Procopius’s Buildings and the Lives of Late Antique Saints: Contrasting Top-Down and Bottom-Up Approaches to Urban Water Management in Late Antiquity (Session VIIIA Food and Water)

Abstract
This paper examines conflicting schemes for Late Antique urban water management that are depicted in the Buildings of Procopius and a selection of Late Antique saints’ lives.

If the first book of Procopius’s Buildings discourses on Justinian’s munificent patronage of churches and infrastructure in Constantinople, the remaining second to sixth books extend that discourse to the provinces, with a particular and hitherto under-acknowledged stress on the relationship between empire and water. Problems of urban water shortage or superabundance are often described consequentially – in each case the problem is followed by a solution discovered by the Emperor (sometimes with the help of divine inspiration), his military officers, or engineers (sometimes including the famous Anthemius and Isidore, now moonlighting as hydraulic specialists) sent from the capital. Execution of the solution is, like Caesar in Gaul, swift and impersonal – Procopius renders an image of highly effective imperial administration that was deeply concerned for the proper provision of water in cities of the empire, and apparently capable of enacting complex, top-down solutions. So, for instance, in Helenopolis (V.ii.1-5): “[Justinian] observed that the city was suffering from shortage of water and was cruelly oppressed by thirst, and [so he]... improvised a marvelous aqueduct and provided it with an unlooked for supply of water, sufficient for the people there not only to drink but also to use for bathing and for all the other luxuries in which men indulge who have an unstinted supply of water. Besides this he [built and restored baths damaged by lack of water and abandonment or neglect].” This is immediately followed by a description of the river Dracon (V.ii.6-13), near Helenopolis, whose superabundance/frequent flooding was managed with imperially directed forest clearance, river diversion, and bridges.

On the other hand, hagiographic sources describe the responsibility of Late Antique saints for the very same problems of urban water management, but from a distinctly bottom-up perspective that favors miracles, smaller scale solutions, and communal participation over large-scale investment and external interference in local concerns: saints are variously credited with divining sources of water before well construction or finding fresh springs, blessing water that was efficacious for healings and miracles, changing the weather on behalf of communities during periods of extraordinary scarcity/superabundance, intervening on behalf of communities with imperial authorities or dishonest contractors during bridge building/dam construction, and initiation of community agricultural improvements (including irrigation) and fertilization projects (e.g., Theodore of Sykeon, 43, 45, 50-51; Symeon the Elder, 64 and 85). Elite saints, like Melania the Elder, are also credited with building water works (including spring heads, latrines, baths, and fountains) for monasteries and communities.

While studies of Late Antique water management have often been content with questions of continuity and catastrophe in the condition of the empire’s infrastructure, this paper attempts to use contemporary sources to better understand how urban water management was hotly contested (and represented in literature) by local and state actors with very different strategies and objectives.

(abstract courtesy of Byzantine Studies Conference)

March-April


March 30–April 1: Masons at Work: Architecture and Construction in the Pre-Modern World Symposium, at Penn (Sponsored by Center for Ancient Studies, Penn)

Dr. Renata Holod, Senior Fellow, College for Women Class of 1963 Term Professor in the Humanities in the Department of the History of Art and Curator of the Near Eastern Section at the Penn Museum, co-organized with Lothar Haselberger and Robert Ousterhout the symposium which assembled specialists in various fields to examine building practices in the pre-modern world, with an emphasis on aspects of construction and structure in ancient Greek, Roman, Byzantine, medieval, and early-to-middle period Islamic architecture.

Seth Bernard, Junior Fellow

The Two-Piece Corinthian Capital and the Strategies of the Roman Builder (God is in the Details session)

Jordan Pickett, Junior Fellow

The Energetics of Monumental Construction in the 13th Century. Three Cross Cultural Case Studies: Seljuk, Kipchak, and Byzantine (Logistics and Materials session)

Abstract
Drawing on decades of formal architectural survey and analysis, much recent scholarship has been directed towards an understanding of the materials and techniques employed by medieval masons to create monumental architecture. But how did the investments of contemporary medieval cultures in monumental architecture differ? That is, if medieval buildings are understood to represent the energy invested in their creation, how did different building forms draw on the material and social resources of patron-cultures, and how might building forms have shaped social structures by stimulating different sectors of specialized or unspecialized labor? The study proposed herein for presentation at the “Masons at Work” Symposium will use newly-generated digital models and labor values from a series of 13th century monuments in order to examine the position of monumental architecture in different cultures and landscapes during the same time period: the Seljuk Agzikarahan in Central Anatolia, the Chingul Kurgan in Ukraine, the Ayyubid Madrasa al-Firdaws in Aleppo, and the Byzantine church of Hagia Sophia in Trabzon.

March


March 29: AIA Society Lecture, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona

Dr. Richard M. Leventhal, Senior Fellow, Professor of Anthropology, Curator of the American Section at the Penn Museum and Executive Director of the Penn Cultural Heritage Center

Preserving Maya Heritage : Examples from the Ancient and Historic Past

Abstract
The Maya past is looked upon with great interest as the evidence and remains of a once great civilization lost in the jungles of Central America.  Both Mexican and American cultures have tied themselves back to this ancient culture – either as the basis for an indigenous past or as the basis for a culture of exploration and study.

At the same time, the Maya people today see continuities and connections to the ancient Maya cities and civilization as well as a direct connection to a more recent history. The Caste War rebellion in the Yucatan of the mid 19th century is a critical historical moment for the modern Maya of the region and is reflected in the more recent Zapatista movement of Chiapas. These continuities and changes in the representation of the Maya past are the focal point for this talk. In addition, a new community project by Leventhal in this region highlights both the ancient and modern past of the Maya living today within the Yucatan.

March 21: Lecture in the series, Actualité de la recherche archéologique at the Musée du Louvre, Paris

Dr. Renata Holod, Senior Fellow, College for Women Class of 1963 Term Professor in the Humanities in the Department of the History of Art and Curator of the Near Eastern Section at the Penn Museum

Sépulture d’un prince nomade dans la steppe de la Mer Noire: rang, élements transculturels et contrôle territorial au début du XIIIe siècle

March 16 and March 17: Lecture at the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston, Texas, in conjunction with the "Tutankhamun: The Golden King and the Great Pharaohs" exhibit

Dr. David Silverman, Senior Fellow, Eckley Brinton Coxe Jr. Professor of Egyptology in the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations, and Curator of the Egyptian Section at the Penn Museum; National Curator for the exhibition

The Curse of the Pharaohs

March 15–17: Forty-Third Annual Conference on African Linguistics, New Orleans, Louisiana

Melinda Nelson-Hurst, Junior Fellow

Concepts of Inheritance in Ancient Egypt: a Lexicographical Examination

March 15: Hewaar-Dialogue: Meaning and Presentation in the Arts of Islamic Culture Conference, Brigham Young University Museum, Provo, Utah

Dr. Renata Holod, Senior Fellow, College for Women Class of 1963 Term Professor in the Humanities in the Department of the History of Art and Curator of the Near Eastern Section at the Penn Museum

Ornaments of the House: Objects of Daily Use

March 2–4: Archaeology and the City: A Conference on Ancient Rome in New York, sponsored by
the Center of the Ancient Mediterranean and the Department of Art History and Archeology of Columbia University



Stephan Zink, Junior Fellow, Research Fellow at Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule, Zurich


Augustus’ Palatine Sanctuary and the So-Called House of Augustus: New Archaeological Documentation—Changing Historical Perspectives

March 1: Douglas G. Lovell, Jr., Annual “Reports from the Field” at the Penn Museum

Lecture and Discussion with Dr. Richard M. Leventhal, Senior Fellow, Professor of Anthropology, Curator of the American Section of the Penn Museum, and Executive Director of the Penn Cultural Heritage Center

Maya Heritage: Ancient and Recent Pasts

Abstract
As foreigners and tourists, we often assume that the Maya people today look to the ancient Maya cities and huge pyramids as an important part of their past and their heritage. This is an assumption that must be questioned. The ancient ruins throughout Central America are clearly seen as an economic engine tied to tourism. But Maya heritage in the Yucatan is connected to something different in their past – a massive rebellion and war of only 150 years ago called the Caste War of the Yucatan. A new Penn project is working in the Yucatan town of Tihosuco on a co-operative community heritage and development program.

February 2012


February 24: Lecture at Columbia University

Dr. Ellen Morris, Fellow, Visiting Associate Research Scholar & Academic Director of the semester abroad program Archaeology and History in Egypt, Columbia University

Dancers, Flashers, and 'Fertility' Figurines in Old- and Middle-Kingdom Egypt

February 22–25: CAA 100th Annual Conference, Los Angeles, CA

Dr. Seth Bernard, Junior Fellow

Concepts of Materiality in the Early Use (and Reuse) of Marble in Mid- Republican Rome and Italy

Dr. Susanna McFadden, Assistant Professor, Department of Art History and Music, Fordham University

Bigger Is Better? Late Roman Painting and the Megalographic Tradition

February 21: Mesopotamian Seminar Series, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK


Dr. Karen Sonik, Fellow, Visiting Assistant Professor, Department of Art History, UCLA

Frontality and the Gaze in Mesopotamian Art

February 9: Lecture at the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World (ISAW), NYU

Dr. Karen Sonik, Fellow, Visiting Assistant Professor, Department of Art History, UCLA

Hybridity, Metamorphosis, and Monstrosity: Defining Identity in Mesopotamia’s First Cities

February 7: Capitol Archaeological Institute Lecture, The George Washington University, Washington, DC


Dr. C. Brian Rose, Senior Fellow, James B. Pritchard Professor of Archaeology, Department of Classical Studies; Curator-in-Charge of the Mediterranean Section, Chief Curator, and Deputy Director, Penn Museum

The Majesty of Troy: Recent Discoveries 1990–2010

January 2012


January 25: American Friends of Turkey (AFOT) Embassy Lecture Series at the Turkish Embassy Chancery in Washington, DC

Dr. Günder Varinlioğlu, Fellow, Byzantine Assistant Curator, Image Collections and Fieldwork Archives (ICFA), Dumbarton Oaks

Monuments, Cityscapes, and People: Turkey, 1930–1945 through the Lens of Nicholas V. Artamonoff

Abstract
Nicholas V. Artamonoff (1908–1989), an amateur photographer from Istanbul, left us a stunning record of the cultural heritage and life in Turkey from 1930 to 1945. His photographs give snapshots of Classical, Byzantine, and Ottoman monuments; streets, shops, and cemeteries; craftsmen, traders, musicians, and children. His photographic work preserved in the collections of Dumbarton Oaks and the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery focuses mainly on Istanbul, but also documents his trips to Bursa, Izmir, and archaeological sites in Western Turkey. This lecture reconstructs the life and career of Nicholas V. Artamonoff by retracing his steps through his photographs. The rising interest in the cultural heritage of Turkey provides the context in which the young Artamonoff, who arrived to Istanbul at the age of fourteen, became an impressive photographer.

January 19–22: Cultural Life of Caves: From Palaeolithic Shamans to Seven Sleepers, Istanbul, Turkey

Dr. Ömür Harmanşah, Fellow, Assistant Professor of Archaeology and Egyptology and Ancient Western Asian Studies in the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World at Brown University organized the international symposium at the Istanbul Research Institute, Pera Museum, in Istanbul.

January 13: 'Middle Paleolithic in the Desert' Conference at Wolfson College, University of Oxford

Zeljko Rezek, Junior Fellow

Some Aspects of Technological Organization in Lithic Assemblages with Stemmed Tools from the Middle Paleolithic of North Africa; A Regional Synthesis

January 12: Lecture in the Department of Classical Studies, Penn

Seth Bernard, Junior Fellow

Building Republican Rome, 390–168 BCE

Abstract
This paper asks after the role that the construction process played in the development of Republican Rome, not only as a physical space, but as a distinct society and economy. How did the creation of new urban fabric in the Middle-Republic transform the city's human fabric? Particular focus will be given in this talk to the period of the Punic Wars.

January 5–8: 113th AIA and APA Joint Annual Meeting, Philadelphia, PA

Margaret M. Andrews, Junior Fellow

Monuments and Morality: The Forum Transitorium and Domitian’s Urban Program in the Subura (Architecture and Topography of Rome Session)

Emerson Avery, Junior Fellow

Sicily, Byzantium, and the Distances Between: The Experience of Exploitation on the Edge of Empire (Sailing Away from Byzantium: People, Goods, and Ideas at the Edges of Empire Colloquium)

Dr. Janice Barrabee, Fellow, Kolb Society Web and Program Coordinator and Consulting Scholar at the Penn Museum

Time and Space on Akkadian Period Cylinder Seals: Representations of the Rising Sun God (Recent Research in Central and East Asia Session)

Seth Bernard, Junior Fellow

Building Temple B: A Case Study from Largo Argentina for Technological Innovation in Roman Republican Architecture (Architecture and Topography of Rome Session)

Miriam G. Clinton, Junior Fellow, collaborated on the paper The Damnoni Excavation: Mesolithic Remains from Southwest Crete (Recent Fieldwork in Aegean Prehistory Session). She also presented the paper A New Method of Defining Private Structures in Minoan Neopalatial Architecture Through Access and Circulation Pattern Analysis (Minoan Studies Session).

Dr. Ömür Harmanşah, Fellow, Assistant Professor of Archaeology and Egyptology and Ancient Western Asian Studies in the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World at Brown University

Water, Place, and Performance in Hittite Landscapes: A View from the Yalburt Spring (Performing Politics: Ritual, Space and Performance in the Bronze Age Aegean and Near East Session)

Dr. Susan Helft, Fellow, co-organized with Lee Ullman, Columbia University, the colloquium "Hittite Anatolia: Beyond the Bridge." She delivered the paper Hittite Seals and Hittite Identity in the session.

Dr. Justin Leidwanger, Fellow, Visiting Research Scholar at the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World, New York University, collaborated with Elizabeth S. Greene, Brock University, and Numan Tuna, Middle East Technical University, on the paper 2011 Harbor Survey at Burgaz, Turkey (Landscape and Settlements Session).

Dr. Susanna McFadden, Fellow, Assistant Professor in the Department of Art History and Music at Fordham University, co-organized with Sarah Lepinski, J. Paul Getty Research Institute, the workshop "Beyond Iconography: Materials, Methods and Meaning in Ancient Painting Studies."

Dr. Emily Modrall, Fellow, collaborated with Lela Urquhart, Georgia State University, on the paper It's All Relative: Measuring Economic Investment and Growth in Archaic-Classical Sicily (Sicily Session).

Amanda S. Reiterman, Junior Fellow, collaborated with Bice Peruzzi, University of Cincinnati, on the poster Learning from Their Mistakes: Try-Pieces, Wasters and Other Evidence for Ceramic Production from the Potters’ Quarter at Corinth. Their poster was awarded the First Runner Up prize in the AIA poster contest.

Link: http://classics.uc.edu/images/stories/aia2012/reiterman_peruzzi_poster.pdf

Amanda also delivered the paper Athena’s Olive or Persephone’s Myrtle Grove?: The ‘Olive-Tree Pediment’ of the Archaic Acropolis Reconsidered (Greek Sculpture Session).

Dr. Julia L. Shear, Fellow, Research Associate at the American School of Classical Studies at Athens, organized the colloquium "Creating Collective Memory in the Greek City." She also delivered the paper The epitaphios and the Construction of Athenian Collective Memory in the session.

January 4–8: By the Dawn’s Early Light: Forging Identity, Securing Freedom, and Overcoming Conflict, SHA 2012 Conference on Historical and Underwater Archaeology, Baltimore, MD

Dr. Matthew Liebmann, Assistant Professor of Anthropology in the Archaeology Program at Harvard University

Historical and Collaborative Archaeology in the Spanish Borderlands (The Historical Archaeology of Native Americans: Past Reflections and Future Directions Symposium)

Kristen R. Fellows, Junior Fellow, co-chaired the session "Analytical Perspectives on Identifying and Modeling Agency within the African Diaspora" and delivered the paper Boundary Making in the African Diaspora: “Inmigrantes Norteamericanos” in Samaná, Dominican Republic

Abstract
In the 1820s approximately 6,000 freedmen left the United States, where they were noncitizens, for the promise of land and full citizenship in the newly formed, black Republic of Haiti. Remnants of a community established by these immigrants can still be found in Samaná, Dominican Republic. This paper discusses the creation, maintenance, and decline of a group identity within the African Diaspora through the manipulation of physical, linguistic, and cultural boundaries. "Los inmigrantes norteamericanos" provide a lens through which we can explore the articulation of racial and national identities within the African Diaspora and during an extended period of volatile change for people living on the Samaná Peninsula. Analyses are based on documentary evidence, oral histories, and material remains in the form of a cemetery study.

Dr. Teagan Schweitzer, Fellow, Adjunct in the Department of Anthropology at Penn

What of the Fish in Fishtown?: A Zooarchaeological Exploration of Diet in a Philadelphia Neighborhood (Hungry for More: Current Themes in Foodways Research Symposium)

November 2011


November 2: Salvatori Lecture hosted by the Consulate General of Italy in Philadelphia and the Center for Italian Studies

Jamie Sanecki, Junior Fellow, with Ann Kuttner

From Rome to Romanic

October 2011


October 30: Archaeological Institute of America Society Lecture, Winnipeg, MB

Dr. Rachel Scott, Fellow, Assistant Professor in the School of Human Evolution and Social Change at Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ

Leprosy and Leper Hospitals in Late Medieval Ireland 

Link:
http://www.archaeological.org/events/5583

October 27: Archaeological Institute of America Society, Wilkie Lecture, Western Carolina (Brevard/Asheville)

Dr. Richard Leventhal, Senior Fellow, Professor in the Department of Anthropology, Curator in the American Section of the Penn Museum, and Director of the Penn Cultural Heritage Center

Stealing the Past: Collectors and Museums of the 21st Century

Link:
http://www.archaeological.org/events/5606

October 26: Penn Museum Scholars Speakers Series, Penn Museum

Joanne Baron, Junior Fellow

The Forgotten King of La Corona: Dynastic Changes in a Classic Maya Community

October 26: Archaeological Institute of America Society, Wilkie Lecture, Gainesville, FL

Dr. Richard Leventhal, Senior Fellow, Professor in the Department of Anthropology, Curator in the American Section of the Penn Museum, and Director of the Penn Cultural Heritage Center

Preserving Maya Heritage: Examples from the Ancient and Historic Past

Link:
http://www.archaeological.org/events/5527

October 20–23: 40th Annual Conference on South Asia, Madison, WI

Dr. Teresa Raczek, Fellow, Assistant Professor in the Department of Geography and Anthropology at Kennesaw State University

A-B and C: A Geographical Exploration into Interaction between the Ahar-Banas and the Indus Region

October 18: Visiting Research Scholar Lecture, Institute for the Study of the Ancient World, NYU

Dr. Sarah Laursen, Fellow, Visiting Research Scholar at the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World, NYU

Leaves of Gold: Head Ornaments from Xianbei Tombs in Northeast China

October 15: Exhibition entitled “Osman Hamdi Bey and the Americans” opened at the Pera Museum, Istanbul

co-curated by Dr. Renata Holod, Senior Fellow, College of Women Class of 1963 Professor in the Department of the History of Art and Curator of the Near East Section of the Penn Museum, and Dr. Robert Ousterhout

October 13: Brown Bag Series in Archaeology, Brown University, Providence, RI

Dr. Ömür Harmanşah, Fellow, Assistant Professor of Archaeology and Egyptology and Ancient Western Asian Studies at the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World of Brown University

Springs, Caves and the Anatolian Countryside

Link: http://ww.w.brownalumnimagazine.com/Departments/Joukowsky_Institute/events/past.html

September 2011


September 29: Lecture at the Free Library of Philadelphia

Dr. Alan Mann, Emeritus Fellow, Professor in the Department of Anthropology at Princeton University

What Does It Mean to Be Human, and How Did We Evolve This Capability?

September 24-25: Meetings of the European Society for the Study of Human Evolution, Leipzig, Germany

Dr. Harold Dibble, Senior Fellow, Professor in the Department of Anthropology and Curator-in-Charge of the European Archaeology Section and Deputy Director for Curatorial Affairs of the Penn Museum, and Site Director, with Vera Aldeias, Jean-Jacques Hublin, Zenobia Jacobs, Daniel Richter, Kaye Reed, Denné Reed, Robert Roberts, Dennis Sandgathe, Teresa Steele, Sam Lin, Zeljko Rezek, Junior Fellow, and Mohamed A. El-Hajraoui

New Excavations at the Grotte des Contrebandiers, Morocco

September 19–22: Stone Age Weaponry Workshop, University of Mainz, Germany

Dr. Radu Iovita, Fellow, Research Fellow in the Department of Palaeolithic Studies at Römisch-Germanisches Zentralmuseum Mainz, co-organized with Katsuhiro Sano (Tohoku University, Japan) and delivered the introductory remarks and a paper.

Controlled Ballistic Experiments with Identical Glass Replicas of Middle Paleolithic Levallois Points

Links:
http://stoneageweaponry.wordpress.com/

July 2011


July 26–30: Egypt at its Origins: The Fourth International Conference on Predynastic & Early Dynastic Egypt, hosted by the MET and the Institute of Fine Arts, NYU

Dr. Matthew D. Adams, Fellow, Senior Research Scholar at the Institute of Fine Arts, NYU, co-chaired the organizing committee and provided introductory and concluding remarks.

Dr. Jane A. Hill, Fellow, Consulting Scholar in the Egyptian Section of the Penn Museum

Imitations of Imports: Foreign Style Pottery of the el-Amra Settlement

Links:
http://www.origins4.org/index.html
http://www.origins4.org/Origins4-Abstracts.pdf
http://www.origins4.org/Origins_4_program.pdf

July 12: Lecture Series at Southern Methodist University, Taos

Dr. Jeremy Sabloff, Emeritus Fellow and past President of the Kolb Society, President of the Santa Fe Institute

The Decline of the Classic Maya Civilization: Potential Lessons

July 11: “Voices from the Past” Series of the Southwest Seminars, Santa Fe, NM

Dr. Matthew Liebmann, Fellow, Assistant Professor of Anthropology in the Archaeology Program at Harvard University

Pueblo Iliad: Archaeological History of the Pueblo Revolt Era and the Jemez Province 1680–1696

Link:
http://www.southwestseminars.org/SouthwestSeminars.org/Voices_From_the_Past_2011.html

July 4–8: 57th Rencontre Internationale Assyriologique: Tradition and Innovation inthe Ancient Near East, Rome, Italy

Dr. Paul Delnero, Fellow, Assistant Professor of Assyriology in the Department of Near Eastern Studies at The Johns Hopkins University

The Sumerian Verbal Prefixes mu-ni- and mi-ni-

Dr. Matthew Rutz, Fellow, Assistant Professor in the Department of Egyptology and Ancient Western Asian Studies at Brown University

Tradition, Contact, Innovation: Communities of Languages, Script and Text in Late Bronze Age Syria

Dr. Karen Sonik, Fellow, Visiting Research Scholar at the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World, NYU

Symmetry, Frontality, and Small Gods: AUnique Tradition of Representation in the Old Babylonian Terracotta Reliefs?

Links:
http://w3.uniroma1.it/rai57/Circolari/Programmme.pdf
http://w3.uniroma1.it/rai57/index.htm

June 2011


June 28: Lecture at Islamic Urban Heritage: Research, Preservation and Management Summer School, Istanbul, June 27–July 29

Dr. Renata Holod, Senior Fellow, College of Women Class of 1963 Professor in the Department of the History of Art and Curator of the Near East Section of the Penn Museum

Local Knowledge and the Construction of Architectural History Narrative(s)

June 26: The “Archaeologists and Travelers in Ottoman Lands" exhibition, which ran from September 26, 2010 to June 26, 2011 closes at the Penn Museum

co-organized by Dr. Renata Holod, Senior Fellow, College of Women Class of 1963 Professor in the Department of the History of Art and Curator of the Near East Section of the Penn Museum, and Dr. Robert Ousterhout

Link:
http://www.sas.upenn.edu/arthistory/news/archaeologists-travelers-ottoman-lands-exhibition-penn-museum

June 23: Naked Science: The World’s Oldest Child airs, describing the discovery of a skeleton of a child from 108,000 years ago at the site of Grotte des Contrabandiers (Smugglers' Cave) in Témara, Morocco

Dr. Harold Dibble, Senior Fellow, Professor in the Department of Anthropology and Curator-in-Charge of the European Archaeology Section and Deputy Director for Curatorial Affairs of the Penn Museum, and Site Director

Link:
http://channel.nationalgeographic.com/series/naked-science/4971/Overview?#tab-Overview.

June 8: “Director's Seminar on Work-in-Progress” at the Warburg InstituteLecture Room, School of Advanced Studies, University of London

Antonio Morales, Junior Fellow 

Misch–Literatur and Privileges in the Age of Pyramids: Royal and Private Aspects of the Ancient Egyptian Afterlife

Link:
http://warburg.sas.ac.uk/index.php?id=570

June 7: Lecture for Brown Alumni Association in Turkey gathering at Koç University, Research Center for Anatolian Civilizations, Istanbul

Dr. Ömür Harmanşah, Fellow, Assistant Professor of Archaeology and Egyptology and Ancient Western Asian Studies at the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World of Brown University

Plato's Spring, Tudhaliya's Pond: Water and Places of Healing in Anatolian Landscapes

May 2011


May 23–27: 33rd International Symposium of Archaeological Excavations, Surveys and Archeometry, organized by the Ministry of Culture and Tourism of Turkey

Dr. Ömür Harmanşah, Fellow, Assistant Professor of Archaeology and Egyptology and Ancient Western Asian Studies at the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World of Brown University

Yalburt Yaylası (Ilgın, Konya) Arkeolojik Yüzey Araştırma Projesi 2010 Sezonu

May 12: Lecture at the British Museum, London

Antonio Morales, Junior Fellow 

Canon and Speculation in the Middle Kingdom Pyramid Texts

May 11: Penn Museum Scholars Lecture Series, Penn Museum

Melinda Nelson-Hurst, Junior Fellow

Middle Kingdom Careers: Ideology vs. Reality

May 7: Archaeological Institute of America New York Society Lectures, Institute for the Study of the Ancient World, NY

Dr. Ellen Morris, Fellow, Clinical Assistant Professor of Egyptology at the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World and Director of Academic Programs for Archaeology and History in Egypt at NYU

Priestesses, Paddle Dolls, and Performance in Ancient Egypt 

May 7: Lecture sponsored by the Pennsylvania Chapter of the American Research Center in Center in Egypt (ARCE-PA), Penn Museum

Dr. Josh Roberson, Fellow

A Tomb for Osiris: Considerations of the Marriage of Myth and Architecture

May 6–8: Theoretical Archaeology Group (TAG) USA 2011: Archaeology of and in the Contemporary World, Berkeley, CA

Dr. Benjamin Porter, Fellow, Assistant Professor of Near Eastern Archaeology in the Near Eastern Studies Department at the University of California, Berkeley, was a co-organizer and provided the introductory remarks for the session “Contemporary Theory in Near Eastern Archaeology I: Politics and Near Eastern Archaeology”

Links:
http://arf.berkeley.edu/TAG2011/ http://arf.berkeley.edu/TAG2011/wp-content/uploads/2010/09/TAG-2011-Program.pdf

May 5: Brown Bag Series in Archaeology, Joukowsky Institute for World Archaeology, Brown University

Jordan Pickett, Junior Fellow

The Transformation of the Roman Bath as a Sculptural and Epigraphic Environment During Late Antiquity

May 1: Ancient Near Eastern Studies Seminar, Faculty of Oriental Studies, University of Oxford, Oxford

Antonio Morales, Junior Fellow

The Old Kingdom Sacerdotal Texts of the Goddess Nut

April 2011


April 30: The grand re-opening of the exhibition “Iraq’s Ancient Past: Rediscovering Ur’s Royal Cemetery,” Penn Museum

co-curated by Dr. Richard Zettler, Senior Fellow, Associate Professor in the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations and Associate Curator-in-Charge, Near East Section of the Penn Museum, and Dr. Holly Pittman, Senior Fellow, Bok Family Professor in the Humanities in the Department of the History of Art and Curator of the Near Eastern Section and Deputy Director for Academic Programs of the Penn Museum

Links :
http://www.penn.museum/sites/iraq/
http://www.penn.museum/long-term-exhibits.html

April 21: Lecture at the Iranian Studies Group at George Mason University, George Mason University, VA

Dr. Christopher Thornton, Fellow, Program Officer on the Committee for Research and Exploration at the National Geographic Society

An American Archeologist in the Islamic Republic of Iran

April 20: Lecture at the American Research Institute in Turkey, Ankara

Dr. Ömür Harmanşah, Fellow, Assistant Professor of Archaeology and Egyptology and Ancient Western Asian Studies at the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World of Brown University

Plato's Spring, Tudhaliya's Pond: Water and Place in Hittite Landscapes

April 19: Middle East Technical University, Faculty of Architecture, Architectural History Talks (29)

Dr. Ömür Harmanşah, Fellow, Assistant Professor of Archaeology and Egyptology and Ancient Western Asian Studies, Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World, Brown University

The Cultural Life of Caves: On Place and Performance at the Source of the Tigris

April 15–18: The British Classical Association Annual Conference 2011, Durham University, UK.

Dr. Julia Shear, Fellow, Senior Association Member at the American School of Classical Studies, Athens, was the organizer of a panel entitled “Creating Collective Memory in the Greek City” and she delivered a paper.

The epitaphios and the Construction of Athenian Collective Memory

Link: http://www.dur.ac.uk/resources/classics/ConferenceBook11_04_2011.pdf

April 15–17: The 29th Annual Maya Weekend: The Ancient Maya in the 21st Century: Advances in Analysis and Presenting the Past, Penn Museum

Federico Paredes, Junior Fellow

The Jaguar Head Core Zone and the Southern Maya

Link:
http://www.penn.museum/documents/events/mayaweekend/MW2011program.pdf

April 12–13: The 20th Annual Meeting of the Paleoanthropology Society, Minneapolis, MN

Dr. Radu Iovita, Fellow, Research Fellow at the Department of Palaeolithic Studies at Römisch-Germanisches Zentralmuseum Mainz

Morphological Variability in Aterian Tanged Tools and Its Implications for the Origins of Projectile Technology

Dr. Harold Dibble, Senior Fellow, Professor in the Department of Anthropology and Curator-in-Charge of the European Archaeology Section and Deputy Director for Curatorial Affairs of the Penn Museum, with Sam Lin (Penn) and Zeljko Rezek, Junior Fellow

The Effects of Core Surface Morphology and Hammer on Flake Attributes

Zeljko Rezek, Junior Fellow

Examining the Accumulation of Different Components of Fine Artifact Fraction Using Geographical Regression: An Example from the Mousterian and Aterian from the Grotte des Contrebandiers (Morocco)

Link:
http://www.paleoanthro.org/pdfs/psoc11%20final%20program.pdf

April 12: Lecture at Brown University, Providence, RI

Dr. Matthew Rutz, Fellow, Assistant Professor in the Department of Egyptology and Ancient Western Asian Studies at Brown University

The Archaeology of Liver Divination in Ancient Mesopotamia

April 8: Lecture at the Department of Anthropology, Yale University, New Haven, CT

Dr. Christopher Thornton, Fellow, Program Officer on the Committee for Research and Exploration at the National Geographic Society

The Origins of Metallurgy in Eurasia: Escaping the Levantine Paradigm

April 2: The Nonhuman, the Subhuman, and the Superhuman: Exploring Nature(s) in the Middle East, graduate student conference sponsored by the Middle East Center at Penn

Dr. Renata Holod, Senior Fellow, College of Women Class of 1963 Professor in the Department of the History of Art and Curator of the Near East Section of the Penn Museum, chaired the session entitled “Representing the Desert”

April 1–3: 62nd Annual Meeting of the American Research Center in Egypt (ARCE), Chicago, IL

Rachel Aronin, Junior Fellow

Falcons, Flagpoles and Seated Gods: Divine Classification in the Book of the Dead

Dr. Dawn McCormack, Fellow, Assistant Professor of History at Middle Tennessee State University in Murfreesboro, TN

The Use of Satellite Imagery to Interpret Coptic Monastic Sites in Wadi al-Natrun, Egypt

Link:
http://arce.org/files/user/page194/AbstractBook2011Final.pdf

April 1: Department of the History of Art Spring Colloquium, Penn

Dr. Holly Pittman, Senior Fellow, Bok Family Professor in the Humanities in the Department of the History of Art and Curator of the Near Eastern Section and Deputy Director for Academic Programs of the Penn Museum

Was Aratta Real? Reflections on Bronze Age Historical Geography of Mesopotamia in Light of Excavations in the Region of Jiroft

March–April 2011


March 31st–April 3rd: NOSTOI: Indigenous Culture, Migration, and Integration in the Aegean Islands and Western Anatolia during the Late Bronze and Early Iron Age, Istanbul

Elif Ünlü, Fellow, Assistant Professor in the Department of History at Bogazici Universitesi

Late Bronze-Early Iron Age Transitional Pottery from the Northeast Mediterranean Settlements

March 30–April 3: Society for American Archaeology 76th Annual Meeting in Sacramento, CA

Joanne Baron, Junior Fellow

Classic Maya Deity Categories

Dr. Ellen Bell, Fellow, Assistant Professor of Anthropology in the Department of Anthropology/Geology at California State University, Stanislaus, was the organizer and chair of the Poster Session: “Who's in Charge Here?” Political Organization and Social Differentiation in Rural Southeast Mesoamerica

Dr. Ellen Bell, Fellow, Assistant Professor of Anthropology in the Department of Anthropology/Geology at California State University, Stanislaus, with Cassandra R. Bill and Marcello A. Canuto

Who’s at the Top in a ‘Top-Down’ Approach?: Social Differentiation and Administrative Strategies in the El Paraíso Valley, Department of Copan, Honduras

Dr. Alexis Boutin, Fellow, Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Sonoma State University, CA, and Dr. Benjamin Porter, Fellow, Assistant Professor of Near Eastern Archaeology in the Near Eastern Studies Department at University of California, Berkeley

Dying in Dilmun: Revisiting the Peter B. Cornwall Collection

Dr. Harold L. Dibble, Senior Fellow, Professor in the Department of Anthropology and Curator-in-Charge of the European Archaeology Section and Deputy Director for Curatorial Affairs of the Penn Museum, with Cathy Zhou, Bonnie Blackwell, A.R. Skinner and S.P. McPherron

ESR Dating at Grotte de Contrebandiers, Témara, Morocco: Developing a New Calculation for Volumetric Doses

Dr. Michael Frachetti, Fellow, Assistant Professor in the Department of Anthropology at Washington University, St. Louis, MO

Expanding Worlds and Local Bronze Age Communities along the Inner Asian Mt. Corridor

Sarah Kurnick, Junior Fellow

Political Authority among Ancient Maya Mid-Level Elites: 2010 Excavations at Callar Creek, Belize

Dr. Matthew Liebmann, Fellow, Assistant Professor of Anthropology in the Archaeology Program at Harvard University

Sacred and Dangerous: The Effects of Spanish Colonialism (and Pueblo Rebellion) on Obsidian Procurement in the American Southwest

Dr. Bryan Miller, Fellow, Consulting Scholar at the Penn Museum

Comparative Analyses of Hinterland Communities: A Multi-scalar Investigation of Iron Age Political Networks in Eastern Inner Asia

Federico Paredes, Junior Fellow, with Margarita Cossich and Hector Neff

Drinking Chilate By The Tomb? A Public Funeral Covered With Ilopango (Tbj) Ash In Western El Salvador.

Dr. Benjamin Porter, Fellow, Assistant Professor of Near Eastern Archaeology in the Near Eastern Studies Department at the University of California, Berkeley, with Alan Farahani

Resource Exploitation of Fresh-water Crustacean Resources in a Semi-arid Environment: A Case Study from Early Iron Age Jordan

Dr. Teresa Raczek, Fellow, Visiting Lecturer in the Department of Anthropology at the University of New Hampshire

When Possessions are Few: Mobility, Materiality, and Minimalism in Northwest India

Dr. Rachel Scott, Fellow, Assistant Professor in the School of Human Evolution and Social Change at Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ

Farmer, Warrior, Cleric, King: Multiple Masculinities in Early Medieval Ireland

Dr. Christopher Thornton, Fellow, Program Officer on the Committee for Research and Exploration at the National Geographic Society

Indus-Mesopotamian Relations: The View from Southeastern Arabia

Dr. Christopher Thornton, Fellow, Program Officer on the Committee for Research and Exploration at the National Geographic Society, with David Massey, Anne Bomalaski, and Ayse Gursan-Salzmann

Cultural Dynamics at Tepe Hissar Iran During the Mid-Fourth Millennium BCE: A GIS Analysis

March 2011


March 29: University of Chicago Workshop for Research in Late Antiquity and Byzantium

Jordan Pickett, Junior Fellow

The Transformation of the Roman Bath as a Sculptural and Epigraphic Environment During Late Antiquity

March 26: Scherman Lecture Series (sponsored by the Scherman Family Foundation), San Francisco, CA

Dr. David Silverman, Senior Fellow, Eckley Brinton Coxe Jr. Professor of Egyptology in the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations and Curator of the Egyptian Section of the Penn Museum

Unity and Writing in Ancient Egypt

link:
http://www.ancientartcouncil.org/program/03-26-11.htm

March 25: Mini Symposium 2: Stories of Place: Building Narratives, Sacred Sites and Topographies of Power, Koç University Research Center for Anatolian Civilizations

Dr. Ömür Harmanşah, Fellow, Assistant Professor of Archaeology and Egyptology and Ancient Western Asian Studies at the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World of Brown University

Pool Stories: Water and Place in Hittite Landscapes

March 25: Lecture for the Ancient Art Council of the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, CA

Dr. David Silverman, Senior Fellow, Eckley Brinton Coxe Jr. Professor of Egyptology in the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations and Curator of the Egyptian Section of the Penn Museum

Cleopatra: The Search for the Last Queen of Egypt

March 21: Ancient Near Eastern Seminar 2010–2011, Columbia University, NY

Dr. Karen Sonik, Fellow, Visiting Research Scholar at the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World, NYU

Frontal Vision: Arresting the Eye and the Enemy in Mesopotamian Art

March 19: Secrets of the Silk Road Symposium

Dr. Jane Hickman, Fellow, Special Assistant to the Director for Museum Programs at the Penn Museum and editor of Expedition organized "Reconfiguring the Silk Road: New Research on East-West Exchange in Antiquity," accompanying the exhibition at the Penn Museum.

Dr. Michael Frachetti, Fellow, Assistant Professor in the Department of Anthropology at Washington University, St. Louis, MO

Seeds for the Soul: East/West Diffusion of Domesticated Grains along the Inner Asian Mountain Corridor

Dr. Christopher Thornton, Fellow, Program Officer on the Committee for Research and Exploration at the National Geographic Society, was the reader for Philip Kohl’s remarks.

Link:
http://www.penn.museum/silkroad/events_symposium.php

March 14–18: Open Workshop: Socio-Environmental Dynamics over the Last 12,000 Years: The Creation of Landscapes II, Christian-Albrechts-Universität of Kiel

Session 6: “Dynamics of Social Space, Social Resistance and Its Reflection and Production in Landscape” 

Dr. Matthew Liebmann, Fellow, Assistant Professor of Anthropology in the Archaeology Program at Harvard University

“Returning to the State of their Antiquity”: Pueblo Landscapes of Resistance to Spanish Colonialism in 17th Century New Mexico

Link:
http://www.uni-kiel.de/landscapes/allgemein/workshop.shtml

March 12–13: Afghanistan: Crossroads of the Ancient World Conference accompanying the exhibition at the British Museum, London

Dr. Jane Hickman, Fellow, Special Assistant to the Director for Museum Programs at the Penn Museum and editor of Expedition

A Closer Look at Gold Jewellry from Tillya Tepe

March 10–14: 221st American Oriental Society Meeting, Chicago, IL

Dr. Paul Delnero, Fellow, Assistant Professor of Assyriology at The Johns Hopkins University

The Transmission of Sumerian Literature

Dr. Matthew Rutz, Fellow, Assistant Professor in the Department of Egyptology and Ancient Western Asian Studies at Brown University

By the Numbers: Tablets, Tallies, and Babylonian-Assyrian Scholastic Texts

Dr. Karen Sonik, Fellow, Visiting Research Scholar at the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World, NYU

Encounters at the Edge of the World: Center-Edge Intrusions and Uruk, the First City

March 2: Great Adventures along the Silk Road Lectures, Penn Museum

Dr. Renata Holod, Senior Fellow, College of Women Class of 1963 Professor in the Department of the History of Art and Curator of the Near East Section of the Penn Museum

Samarkand in the Age of Tamerlane (Timur Lang)

Link:
http://www.penn.museum/silkroad/events_lectures.php

February 2011


February 26: 15th Annual University of New Mexico Anthropology Graduate Student Union Graduate Research Symposium: Keynote Panel Presentation

Dr. Matthew Liebmann, Fellow, Assistant Professor of Anthropology in the Archaeology Program at Harvard University, with Michael Trujillo (University of New Mexico) and Sarah Horton (UC-Denver)

Each participant gave a presentation of his/her work stemming from recent publication or current research in New Mexico followed by a roundtable discussion moderated by Dr. Erin Debenport (University of New Mexico).

February 25: Lecture at the Newberry Library, Chicago

Dr. Renata Holod, Senior Fellow, College of Women Class of 1963 Professor in the Department of the History of Art and Curator of the Near East Section of the Penn Museum

Imported and Native Remedies for a Wounded Prince: The Chungul Kurgan Grave Goods in the Northern Black Sea Steppe of the Thirteenth Century

February 24: Yucatan in Pennsylvania Roundtable, Penn State University

Participants included: Joanne Baron, Junior Fellow, Sarah Kurnick, Junior Fellow, and Dr. Richard Leventhal, Senior Fellow, Professor in the Department of Anthropology and Curator in the American Section of the Penn Museum, and Director of the Penn Cultural Heritage Center

February 24: Lecture at the University of Memphis Institute of Egyptian Art and Archaeology (sponsored by the Tennessee Chapter of the American Research Center in Egypt)

Dr. Dawn McCormack, Fellow, Assistant Professor of History at Middle Tennessee State University, Murfreesboro, TN

Excavations at the site of Abydos, Egypt

February 12: Lecture at the Pre-Columbian Society at the University of Pennsylvania Museum

Joanne Baron, Junior Fellow

Before the Faces of their Gods: Classic Maya Patron Deities and Classic Maya Communities

February 9–12: College Art Association 99th Annual Meeting, New York

Dr. Ömür Harmanşah, Fellow, Assistant Professor of Archaeology and Egyptology and Ancient Western Asian Studies at the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World at Brown University, organized the session “Event Place Performance: Theorizing Architectural Spaces in the Ancient World(s)”

February 8: Lecture hosted by the Center for Italian Studies, the Department of Romance Languages, and the Consulate General of Italy in Philadelphia, Penn

Emerson Avery, Junior Fellow

Important Enough to Ignore: Sicily’s Age of Imperial Inattention (1st–7th Cent. C.E.)

January 2011


January 26–27: International Workshop on Digitizing Artifacts and Documentation from Sir Leonard Woolley’s Excavations at Ur

Penn Museum hosted the workshop (made possible by the Leon Levy Foundation) with representatives from the Penn Museum, British Museum, and Iraq National Museums to discuss digitizing the more than 21,000 objects excavated at Ur by Sir Leonard Woolley in the 1920s and 1930s.

Dr. C. Brian Rose, Senior Fellow, James B. Pritchard Professor of Archaeology in the Department of Classical Studies and Curator-in-Charge of the Mediterranean Section, Chief Curator, and Deputy Director of the Penn Museum

Dr. Richard Hodges, President of Kolb Society, Charles K. Williams II Director of the Penn Museum

Dr. Richard Zettler, Senior Fellow, Associate Professor of the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations and Associate Curator-in-Charge of the Near East Section of the Penn Museum

Dr. William Hafford, Fellow, Consulting Scholar at the Penn Museum

January 26: Science on Tap Lecture, Washington University, St. Louis, MO

Dr. Michael D. Frachetti, Fellow, Assistant Professor in the Department of Anthropology at Washington University, St. Louis, MO

Discovering the Roots of Civilization Using GIS and Remote Sensing

January 19: Lecture at the National Arts Club, New York

Dr. C. Brian Rose, Senior Fellow, James B. Pritchard Professor of Archaeology in the Department of Classical Studies and Curator-in-Charge of the Mediterranean Section, Chief Curator, and Deputy Director of the Penn Museum

Troy: Spanning Millenia

Link:
http://www.nationalartsclub.org/pb_Committees_Archaeology.php

January 7–9: 142nd Joint Annual Meeting of the Archaeological Institute of America (AIA) and the American Philological Association (APA), San Antonio, Texas.

Miriam G. Clinton, Junior Fellow

New Evidence for Minoan Staircases

Justin Leidwanger, Junior Fellow, with Peter van Alfen (The American Numismatic Society) and  Frederick H. van Doorninck, Jr. (Institute of Nautical Archaeology at Texas A&M University)

Yassıada Revisited

Dr. Matthew Adams, Fellow, Senior Research Scholar at the Institute of Fine Arts, NYU

The Mudbrick Cult Enclosure of Khasekhemwy (the Shunet el-Zebib) and the Cultural Landscape of Abydos: A Monument at Risk

Margaret M. Andrews, Junior Fellow

The Reuse of Ancient Tuff Blocks in Late Antique and Early Medieval Rome

Kelcy Sagstetter, Junior Fellow

A Paternity Crisis after the Sicilian Expedition: The Decrees of the Demotionidai Reconsidered

January 5–9: Society for Historical Archaeology 2011 Conference, Austin, Texas: “Boundaries and Crossroads in Action: Global Perspectives in Historical Archaeology”

Kristen R. Fellows, Junior Fellow

An Historical Archaeology of North American Immigrants in Samana, Dominican Republic: A Preliminary Look at the Cemetery Data (Poster Session)

January 5: Great Adventures along the Silk Road Lectures, Penn Museum

Dr. Renata Holod, Senior Fellow, College of Women Class of 1963 Professor in the Department of the History of Art and Curator of the Near East Section of the Penn Museum

From Baghdad to Bukhara and Back

Link:
http://www.penn.museum/silkroad/events_lectures.php

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